Reprieve from the drought: Copley Retention Dam

After 3 years of drought, the thriving bird haven of the Copley Retention Dam had almost completely evaporated. Flooding summer rains in the Northern Flinders Ranges replenished the dam overnight.

Throughout the flood / drought cycle, Copley Retention Dam is supporting over 70 recorded bird species, many of which are profiled on the Flinders Ranges Field Naturalists site including birds classified as Rare by the South Australian National Parks and Wildlife Act, such as

  • Musk Duck
  • Blue-billed Duck
  • Australasian Darter
  • Elegant Parrot
  • Great Crested Grebe.
Retention Dam in drought
Retention Dam in flood

Flinders Ranges from the air

Druid Range, south east of Wilpena Pound
Elder Range and Red Range, south west of Wilpena Pound
Wilpena Pound from the south
Ediowie Gorge, west side of Wilpena Pound
Heyson Range (left) and parallel ABC Range running north-south on the north side of Wilpena Pound
North east side of Wilpena Pound
Rawnsley Bluff, east side of Wilpena Pound

Copley Quartzite

A view of the Copley Quartzite formation that contains Aroona Dam, and in the distance the Brachina siltstone formation of the Bayley Range.

View from Copley Lookout

Gammon Ranges

The distinctive peaks of Arkaroola as seen from the north of the Gammon Ranges.

North of the quartzite pound are precambrian formations of shale and limestone of the Tapley Hill and Aberoona formations.

Caustic Bush

Native succulent Sarcostema viminale ssp astrale also known as Caustic Bush, Milk Bush, Caustic Plant, Lye Bush, Snake Plant, Pencil Caustic, Milk Vine, here seen at the Lyndhurst Ochre Pits.